Information Science
Centre for Knowledge Dynamics and Decision-making
Stellenbosch University
South Africa

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Information Systems Management
Socio-Informatics
Decision-making and Knowlegde Management
UNDERGRADUATE MODULES
Information Systems Management
Socio-Informatics
Decision-making and Values
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Honours Degrees (NQF 8)
Master’s Research Degrees
(NQF 9)
Doctoral Research Degrees
(NQF 10)
SHORT COURSES AND CONSULTING
RESEARCH

Staff

Department Chair
Prof. Bruce Watson
Lecturing Staff
Prof. Johann Kinghorn
Prof. Hans Müller
Mr. Daan Botha
Mr. Christiaan Maasdorp
Mr. Dewald Blaauw
Dr. Daan le Roux
Ms. Rene Robbertze
Mr. Richard Barnett
Ms. Liesl van der Rede
Mr. Molupe Thelejane
Mr. Abie Nthurubele
Logistics & Secretarial
Ms. Netta Strauss
Ms. Alma vd Spuy

Prof. Hans Müller

Prof. Hans Müller studied Philosophy, Theology and Social Theory at the universities of Stellenbosch, Utrecht (Netherlands) and Tübingen (Germany). He holds a Masters in Philosophy and a Doctorate in Social Theory from the University of Stellenbosch.

He was awarded the German Exchange Scholarship in 1992/93, the HSRC grant for advanced study abroad in 1993, was an invited participant in a Summer Institute for scholars at the New School for Social Research in New York in 1997 and Research Fellow of the Department of Sociology at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) in 2001 and the Department of Sociology at the University of Tilburg (Netherlands) in 2003-2004.

His research has mostly been of a social theoretical nature and has dealt with the role of culture, values and religion in society. More recently he has been developing a unique contribution to empirical comparative research on social and cultural values. This research is directed at comparing African countries among one another and with non African countries in terms the social and cultural values that may play a role in the social and economic development of the African countries. Aspects which are under investigation at the moment are work values and work ethos and social capital and religion. The overarching framework investigates social and cultural values that cluster around the dimensions of human relationships and human qualities, power and cosmology.

The Southern African Values Project has now, under his direction received the status of a Comparative Research Network under the auspices of the Council for Social Science Research in Africa. The project goes under the heading of ‘Local poverty, values, and development in a global society’ and is a collaborative exercise bringing together university colleagues from 6 SADC countries. The aim is to generate sophisticated data on core values and value patterns in the region with a view to:

  • Adding a vital human dimension to a regional scenarios dealing with development
  • Identifying shared, as well as conflicting values
  • Generating strategic knowledge to enhance decision-making about development in both the private and public sectors of the national structures and regional initiatives
  • Making creativity and development potential unique to the region transparent
  • Comparing socio-cultural trends in Southern Africa with those in other regions of the world
He has co-edited a book and contributed a number of articles to academic and popular journals and books. He regularly presents papers at international academic conferences hosted by academic societies for the sociology of religion, African societies, and values analysis. Recent articles have been:

  • 'Contemporary Work Values in Africa and Europe', published in the International Journal of Comparative Sociology (Volume 47 Issue 2). The article can be accessed here.
  • 'Contemporary work values in Africa and Europe, Comparing orientations to work in African and European societies’, with Halman, L. 2005. Submitted to international journal.
  • ‘The values of parents: interpreting the results of a survey of parents in terms of contemporary social change and educational policy directions’, in: South African Journal of Education, 2004, 24(2) 105-176.
  • ‘The application of Inglehart’s Materialism-Postmaterialism index in non-industrialised countries ' a critique’ in: Acta Academica, 2004, 36(1) 127-156.
  • ‘A theoretical perspective on the societal significance of religion in South Africa’ in: Acta Academica, 2000: 32(3), 1-41.
  • ‘The invention of religion: aspects of the South African case’ in: Social Dynamics, 2000: 26 (1), 56-75.
  • ‘Encountering recent African migrants and immigrants to South Africa: Towards understanding the role of religion and culture in the reception of recent African migrants and immigrants in South Africa’ in: Scriptura, 1999:1, 67-73.
He leads and teaches in the undergraduate programme for Value and Policy Studies and teaches in Socio-Informatics. On the post-graduate level he leads and teaches in the Masters Programme for Decision-making, Knowledge Dynamics and Values and teaches in the Programme for Information and Knowledge Management. He has supervised 7 Masters theses to completion in this context. His areas of expertise in teaching are Values Analysis, Values in Organisations, Values in Contemporary Society, Decision-Making Theory and Decision-making and Culture. He also dabbles in Lateral Thinking and notions of Thought Leadership.

When possible, Hans spends time with Anneke and the two kids Anna-Marie and Peter, exploring the world virtually and actually (reading, talking, hiking, on safari and touring abroad).

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